Jim

I am really having a hard time understanding this sin nature thing. I am doing better at understanding Grace and The Trinity but I don't know about this sin nature thing.

If God created us, and we are born with a sin nature...then our sin nature comes from how God created us...He made us to be that way...so how is it our fault that we are sinners? How come we are just such horrible awful people then if God created us? And then God comes down to be crucified for our sins that He created us to make...I don't get it. Why does He need to save His creations from how He created them? It doesn't make sense!

Adam and Eve both sinned in the Garden of Eden and they fell and no more were able to be with God always. But here is what I dont get...they were not born sinners...they were obviously innocent until they sinned. So how come we as people are not like that either? How come little children are sinners when they are born? They are pure and innocent and Jesus said that we must become like little children in order to get into heaven...so how come even children are sinners?

This is something I am having a hard time understanding...and I will be honest that the LDS concept of this makes more sense right now...help me figure this out...are there any scriptures that can help me figure this out? I just donŐt understand why God would make his creations inherently bad so that He would need to save them from themselves. It almost seems like some sort of sick twisted movie or something if you think of it that way. I am not trying to be blasphemous...I really am just not getting this!!!

Ę Help
Stephanie

  Stephanie,

What may be confusing you is the perverted take the Mormon Church has on "The Fall." In Mormonism the Fall was a noble thing! But not in the Bible.

God created Adam who was without sin. But he had the _capacity_ to sin (to disobey God)--If he did _not_ have that capacity, he could really be a noble creature, for what merit is there for a person who does not sin if he had no choice.

God could have made us sinless _and_ without the capacity to sin. However to do so would have been to create a being who was not capable of choosing to follow God. C. S. Lewis said it this way:

Mere Christianity, 53: ---When we have understood about free will, we shall see how silly it is ask, as somebody once asked me: "Why did God make a creature of such rotten stuff that it went wrong?" The better stuff a creature is made of--the cleverer and stronger and freer it is--then the better it will be if it goes right, but also the worse it will be if it goes wrong. A cow cannot be very good or very bad; a dog can be both better and worse; a child better and worse still; an ordinary man, still more so; a man of genius, still more so; a superhuman spirit best--or worst--of all.

The problem is that when Adam _did_ choose to sin, that nature was what he had to pass onto his posterity--flawed, separated from God.

But God _so loved the world, that he did not desire the death of sinners, so he sent his own son to redeem (buy back) man.

Stephanie: this is the accurate biblical explanation. And think of it, nothing else could account for the continuing, endless example of sin in the nature of man. Look around.

Also, you might want to read this very short piece:

http://www.mazeministry.com/worldviews/theology/sin.htm

Hope that helps.

Jim